Particle physics laboratory

Week in Tech: Opening of a living architecture laboratory in Switzerland


Romain Keller
The HiLo unit

The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ), the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Sciences and Technologies (Eawag) officially inaugurated HiLo, a living laboratory that will study how “the lightness of structures and efficient construction methods can be combined with intelligent and adaptive building systems to reduce intrinsic and operational emissions in the construction and building sector”, according to an ETH press release Zurich. Located in Duebendorf, Switzerland, the two-story structure was designed and built using computer design and manufacturing techniques. It features a double curvature concrete roof and an innovative low concrete structure “funicular” structural floor system which is reinforced by rib-shaped walls inside each flooring panel.

The HiLo unit
Romain Keller
The HiLo unit
The HiLo unit
Romain Keller
The HiLo unit

The HiLo building is equipped with an adaptive solar facade that can be manipulated to control how sunlight enters the structure, maximizing passive cooling opportunities. With HiLo open, researchers will study the project in real time, tracking how “the construction and operation of buildings can be designed to be as energy and resource efficient as possible, while ensuring an attractive architectural space and high level of comfort “, according to the same press release. [ETH Zurich]

Researchers at the Columbia Climate School in New York reported that global exposure to deadly urban heat had tripled since the 1980s. For their research, the scientists studied more than 13,000 cities around the world, finding as the number of days that city dwellers are exposed to extreme heat and humidity is increasing, a problem that now affects nearly a quarter of the world’s population. “It has broad effects,” said Cascade Tuholske, lead author of the study and a researcher at the Earth Institute at Columbia University. “It increases morbidity and mortality. It has an impact on the ability of people to work and leads to a decline in economic production. This worsens pre-existing health problems. [Columbia Climate School]

The virtual pavilion of the built environment of COP26, by AECOM in collaboration with the designers of the exhibition Install Archive
AECOM
The virtual pavilion of the built environment of COP26, by AECOM in collaboration with the designers of the exhibition Install Archive

Following an international open call, the UK Green Building Council selected 17 projects from around the world as part of its virtual pavilion on the built environment COP26 at the United Nations Climate Conference COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland . One of the projects featured in the pavilion is the TECLA prototype, by Mario Cucinella Architects and WASP, which ARCHITECT has covered here. [ARCHITECT]

Scientists measuring the effects of large-scale solar farms have found that power plants can cool surrounding land, according to a recent publication from Lancaster University in the UK. Lancaster researchers worked with scientists from the University of Ludong in China and the University of California, Davis. study two large solar parks located in arid areas: a 300 MW Stateline solar park in California and the 850 MW Longyangxia solar park in China. As the farms captured solar energy, they also created “cool islands” within 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) surrounding the park’s borders. “This reinforces the importance of understanding the implications of renewable energy technologies on the host landscape – we need to ensure that the energy transition does not cause undue damage to ecological systems and ideally has net positive consequences on places. where we build them, “Lancaster University Co-Principal Investigator Alona Armstrong said in a university press release. [Lancaster University]

The Brooklyn neighborhood in New York has worn several hats since its inception in 1898. Through documents from the Building Technology Heritage Library, we can examine its history as a manufacturing hub for greater New York City, home to Brooklyn-based companies that produced woodwork, metals, and paints. [ARCHITECT]

In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire destroyed more than 17,000 buildings in its 3 mile route through the city. Now that 150 years have passed since the tragedy, The Chicago Tribune examine six buildings that were in the way of the fire but remain standing. [The Chicago Tribune]

This week the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm appointed the winners of his 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics. Half of the prize went to Syukuro Manabe of Princeton University and Klaus Hasselmann of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany, while the other half went to went to Giorgio Parisi of the Sapienza University in Rome in recognition of their research on climate change and how human behavior influences the climate. [The New York Times]


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