Particle physics research

Fermilab PhD student receives outstanding research award for his thesis

The American Physical Society has awarded Ihar Lobach its 2022 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Research in Beam Physics. Cited for “his outstanding research contributions to our understanding of undulator radiation fluctuations and for developing an experimental method to determine electron beam properties from these fluctuations”, Lobach conducted his thesis research at Fermi National US Department of Energy Accelerator Laboratory.

Ihar Lobach, working at IOTA at Fermilab. Photo: Evan Angelico

The annual APS Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Research Award in Beam Physics recognizes doctoral thesis research of outstanding quality and achievement in beam physics and engineering. The award comes with $2,500, a certificate, and travel reimbursement up to $500. Lobach will also receive a registration waiver to receive the award and present at the April 2022 meeting of the APS Division of Beam Physics.

After earning his bachelor’s degree in physics from Belarusian State University in 2017, Lobach enrolled at the University of Chicago and joined the Fermilab Accelerator Ph.D. program in 2018. He completed his doctorate in particle accelerator physics at the University of Chicago in 2021. A former summer intern in what is now known as the Helen Edwards Internship Program, Lobach returned to Fermilab at Fermilab to conduct his thesis research at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator, or IOTA, storage ring, under the direction of Sergei Nagaitsev, head of accelerator science programs and professor at the University of Chicago, and Giulio Stancari, principal investigator. He studied the statistical properties of the undulating radiation generated by a bunch of electrons and by a single electron circulating in the ring.

Cited for “outstanding research contributions to our understanding of undulator radiation fluctuations and for developing an experimental method to determine electron beam properties from these fluctuations”, Ihar Lobach conducted his thesis research at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory of the United States Department of Energy.

Also the recipient of the University of Chicago’s 2021 Nathan Sugarman Award for Excellence in Academic Research, Lobach has now begun his postdoctoral appointment at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. His research focuses on the applications of machine learning for tuning, control and anomaly detection of accelerators.

The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is supported by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The Office of Science is the largest supporter of basic physical science research in the United States and works to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.